Setting Up My PM935 Mill
#1
Well, it's official. I'll be getting a new mill in about eight weeks. I put down the required 20% today.

Now to get my existing mill fixed and running again. I plan on keeping it until the new mill is up and running. Then I'll sell it.

Ed
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#2
YAY!!!
Logan 200, Clarke 7x12, Index 40H Mill, Boyer-Shultz 612 Surface Grinder, HF 4x6 Bandsaw, ...
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#3
I knew you had it in your wallet,  Big Grin Big Grin Big Grin

I keep dreaming that someone will drop a new lathe on my front porch
dallen, proud to be a member of MetalworkingFun Forum since Apr 2012.

If life seems normal, your not going fast enough! Tongue
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#4
(06-15-2015, 05:47 PM)dallen Wrote: I knew you had it in your wallet,  Big Grin Big Grin Big Grin

...

Well, not quite accurate but thanks anyway. Big Grin

Ed
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#5
We seemed to have lost Mike but just in case he returns.

Mike,

I see from your videos that you got your mill with the power feed installed. Can you tell me if the crank handles are the free wheeling safety handles?

Thanks,
Ed
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#6
(06-14-2015, 02:49 PM)EdK Wrote: Mike,

When you get a chance would, you please post a picture of the insides of the electrical box? My mill will come with a VFD but not installed so I'd like to do some homework prior to its arrival. No rush.

Thanks,
Ed

(06-19-2015, 09:26 PM)EdK Wrote: We seemed to have lost Mike but just in case he returns.

Mike,

I see from your videos that you got your mill with the power feed installed. Can you tell me if the crank handles are the free wheeling safety handles?

Thanks,
Ed


Nope, you didn't lose me or scare me off for that matter. The wife and I have just been in Grand Teton NP for the past week relaxing and have not had any internet, sorry to leave you hanging.

My mill is a single phase variable speed head so there isn't an electrical box per se. It merely has a single connection in which needed to be attached to a standard 220-single phase connection and it feeds a rotary switch and then the motor.

With the power X-axis the handles are very easy to turn still and they are not like the BP's in that you have to push and hold in while turning the ball crank handles. They simply turn very easily while going through the motor for the powered axis. The travels are still very fluid and smooth even on the X-axis with the motor. I don't use the power X-axis as much as I thought I would but for longer cuts and a consistant finish it sure works well.

Mike.

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#7
(06-21-2015, 04:12 PM)zmotorsports Wrote: Nope, you didn't lose me or scare me off for that matter.  The wife and I have just been in Grand Teton NP for the past week relaxing and have not had any internet, sorry to leave you hanging.

My mill is a single phase variable speed head so there isn't an electrical box per se.  It merely has a single connection in which needed to be attached to a standard 220-single phase connection and it feeds a rotary switch and then the motor.

With the power X-axis the handles are very easy to turn still and they are not like the BP's in that you have to push and hold in while turning the ball crank handles.  They simply turn very easily while going through the motor for the powered axis.  The travels are still very fluid and smooth even on the X-axis with the motor.  I don't use the power X-axis as much as I thought I would but for longer cuts and a consistant finish it sure works well.

Mike.

Mike,

The Grand Tetons have been on my list of places to visit for years. Once I retire, that's the first trip I'll be taking.

Thanks very much for the information on the mill. Thumbsup

Ed
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#8
(06-21-2015, 04:28 PM)EdK Wrote:
(06-21-2015, 04:12 PM)zmotorsports Wrote: Nope, you didn't lose me or scare me off for that matter.  The wife and I have just been in Grand Teton NP for the past week relaxing and have not had any internet, sorry to leave you hanging.

My mill is a single phase variable speed head so there isn't an electrical box per se.  It merely has a single connection in which needed to be attached to a standard 220-single phase connection and it feeds a rotary switch and then the motor.

With the power X-axis the handles are very easy to turn still and they are not like the BP's in that you have to push and hold in while turning the ball crank handles.  They simply turn very easily while going through the motor for the powered axis.  The travels are still very fluid and smooth even on the X-axis with the motor.  I don't use the power X-axis as much as I thought I would but for longer cuts and a consistant finish it sure works well.

Mike.

Mike,

The Grand Tetons have been on my list of places to visit for years. Once I retire, that's the first trip I'll be taking.

Thanks very much for the information on the mill.   Thumbsup

Ed

No problem Ed.

Ya, my wife and I love Grand Teton NP. This is our fourth trip there in the past 8 years or so and just marvel at the beauty the area has to offer.

Mike.

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#9
Mike,

Do you have the part number and brand for the cylinder you used? I want to get one so I have it when my mill arrives.

Also, what is the diameter of the base? The drawing doesn't show that dimension.

Oops! Never mind. I watched your video again and you said it was 6.8" in diameter.

Thanks,
Ed
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#10
I must be getting old, the knee powerfeed is the one I'm really thankful for. Cranking the table up and down is not high on my list of things to do. I always lower the table as low as possible to making the change over to of from the rotary table, as easy as possible.
jack
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