Carport mini shop
#21
(02-28-2019, 10:08 AM)JScott Wrote: ... and my wife loves it.

Face it, this was the only REAL criteria that had to be satisfied Smile.

By the way, the rest of us also like it.
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#22
Actually that was a typo, Andrew. I meant to say stiffened. Like you say though, there are many words and sayings between here and there that mean very different things.

Tom
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#23
Very nice result with the building and the fence. The master stroke is the raised slab; so many people make the mistake of trying to divert water with little drains which are fine until it really decides to rain.
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#24
You are so right about drainage.  The drainage feature was partly an accident in that the slab was originally intended to be full width and thickness.  My contractor talked me into lowering the sides and turning them into sidewalks/splash zones to save concrete.  This is because our house is raised up on fill for good drainage since we are in a hurricane zone.  And we do get some serious rain events here.  Probably saved about 3 yards of concrete and the extra labor for forming.

We left the sides of the carport open for light and ventilation but even if some rain blows in the slab is crowned to shed water to the sides and the storage area is 2 inches higher than the carport so no water can run up inside there.

I think the little sidewalks that wrap around the slab add a nice finishing touch to the carport.

Very happy with the way it all came together and the icing on the cake (as noted earlier) is that SWMBO is super happy.   Smiley-dancenana

JScott
JScott, proud to be a member of MetalworkingFun Forum since Mar 2014.
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#25
(02-28-2019, 11:44 PM)TomG Wrote: Actually that was a typo, Andrew. I meant to say stiffened. Like you say though, there are many words and sayings between here and there that mean very different things.

Tom

If you ever say nice fanny to an English gal be prepared for a good old fashioned beating.
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#26
I was at the bar the other night with my buddy having some beers. We had been there a while when two large girls came up to the bar and ordered some drinks. I noticed when they ordered they both had strong accents so I said ‘Hi, are you two girls from Scotland?’ One of them spoke up, with quite an attitude and said ‘it’s WALES you idiot!!!’

So I immediately said ‘Sorry, are you two Whales from Scotland?’

I don't remember much after that...
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#27
Rotfl Rotfl Rotfl
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#28
Can't have been from Wales, they were all bred to be short like pit ponies to fit in the mines :)
Andrew Mawson, proud to be a member of MetalworkingFun Forum since Oct 2013.
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#29
I descended from a fellow by the name of John Griffin, son of Johan Pengruffwnd in the late 1600's. He lived in Pembroke, Wales and would be my eighth great grandfather. Two of his son's immigrated to the U.S. and settled in Connecticut. I need to get over there and visit the area.

Tom
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#30
Ah but Pembrokeshire is known as 'little England beyond Wales' due to the large number of none original population resulting from Wales being subjugated and the large number of castles built to control the locals. Pembroke Castle being of course a prime example.

Neither of the names you mention sound at all Welsh in origin.
Andrew Mawson, proud to be a member of MetalworkingFun Forum since Oct 2013.
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