Making your own chamber reamers
#1
Ok, I am extremely interested in this but I have never done it. I got approval from the author to share it here and I know that NevadaBlue as the maker of the PDF won't mind either. I have not tried this but one of the members on Weapons Guild that I talk to pretty frequently has made several reamers using this tutorial. Hope it helps some people out and maybe get a few more interested in the hobby!!

Links:
http://www.weaponsguild.com/forum/index....ic=32369.0

http://garagegunsmithing.com/index.php?o...f=17&t=206


.pdf   make your own chamber reamers.pdf (Size: 467.42 KB / Downloads: 126)
SnailPowered, proud to be a member of MetalworkingFun since Aug 2012.
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#2
SP,
Mmmm ........... the first link I can't see because I'm not a member.

.....................The second link gives me a 404 error Chin

The PDF if fine Smile
Smiley-eatdrink004
DaveH
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#3
Quote:Garage Gunsmithing is moving to a new server and will be back soon.
---------<snip>------------
We are very sorry for the inconvenience, but we are confident that everyone will be pleased with the end result.
Thank you
Willie
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#4
Well the links are just to reference where i got it from really. All of the info needed is in the PDF I believe. Hope this helps! Thumbsup
SnailPowered, proud to be a member of MetalworkingFun since Aug 2012.
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#5
(08-25-2012, 05:50 PM)DaveH Wrote: SP,
Mmmm ........... the first link I can't see because I'm not a member.

.....................The second link gives me a 404 error Chin

The PDF if fine Smile
Smiley-eatdrink004
DaveH

You should sign up for the Guild. Lots of good info.
Thumbsup

The Garage is going through some changes. Hopefully it will be back up soon.
pamrick, proud to be a member of MetalworkingFun since Jul 2012.
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#6
Hopefully the Garage gunsmithing site will reopen. The owner fell ill and we are attempting to transfer the site to one of the other founders. Good folks there too.
Ken
An old tired/retired/wanna-be machinist. Cool
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#7
Here's my latest attempt at a shop made reamer. After several (meaning 'many') semi-failed attempts with less than satisfactory results, I think I finally hit on the right procedure. My first attempts involved using "mystery metal" of questionable origin. I finally broke down ("broke" being the operative word here) and ordered some O1 tool steel from Speedy Metals.
Here's a pictorial of the process.
I got my drawings, like a good boy and promptly began changing them I think that's SOP for making precision tooling. Here's the stock and drawing.
   

Next I drilled centers and cut the square drive head. I used an el-cheapo 5C holder for this.
       

Now comes the fun part.. Since I didn't have a 5/8 collet to match the O1, I had to turn it down to 9/16.
   
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#8
Then I marked all the diameter changes and turned the OD to within .010" at those points.
   

I turned all the straight tapers at this point. Then I offset the tailstock and turned the tapers.

   

Here it is all polished to size and ready for fluting.

   

Next I moved to the mill with my hex collet holder. I set it up with a stop so I could keep the flute lengths the same.

       
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#9
Flutes are cut and it kinda looks like a reamer.
       

After heat treat and final polish/sharpening, it cuts like a reamer as well.

       
pamrick, proud to be a member of MetalworkingFun since Jul 2012.
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#10
I used my oxy torch to heat treat, bringing the color to cherry red and holding for about 3 minutes. Then I quenched in used motor oil, using a swirling motion to cool the reamer as quickly as possible. I didn't draw the reamer, choosing instead to leave it glass hard.

Some final thoughts on reamer making:
1) Use quality stock for a predictable out come.
2) pay attention to the dimensions and watch the temp on your work. The stock heated up quickly and added a few .001" to the work. I let mine cool a while before final sizing. When it is cool to the touch, I start working again.
3) When reaming, watch chip build-up. Clean swarf often. I didn't expect the reamer to cut so well and consequently, I let chips build up in the chamber. I don't know if this will impact the cartridge performance yet since my dies just arrived and I haven't procured bullets yet.
4) After a reasonably successful result, I will probably make the majority of my reamers from now on.

And yes, in case you're wondering, the cartridge in the picture is what the rifle is chambered for. I'm sure Snailpowered recognizes it. I'll let him tell you more about it since he's home now from the sand box.

Welcome back buddy!!!!
pamrick, proud to be a member of MetalworkingFun since Jul 2012.
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