Pressure Washer
#11
That was plan A, Al, or maybe plan A-1, A-1 was developed when I realized they were going to hit each other. Didn't think it would look right tilted and was concerned about the oil level.
The screws that go through the motor would only have been threaded into the aluminum about 1/4 inch, they're better in the steel studs anyway.
Got the pump mounted to the wall and some of the water line ran. Need to get to town for conduit to run a 220 circuit over there and some more fittings.
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Greg
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#12
Looking good Greg.
Hunting American dentists since 2015.
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#13
Smiley-signs009

It has an added benefit as well. Nobody is going to bother to ask to "borrow" that pressure washer. Big Grin
Willie
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#14
Had the pump in the corner of the shop, there was no room for a real, decided coiling the hose would get old and messy quick so today I made a real and moved the pump over too a open part of the wall.
[Image: IMG_2169.jpg]
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Greg
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#15
Nice Greg.

How have you made the high pressure rotating joint? I need to do the same - I've got an old fire hose reel to adapt, but mine is a diesel steam cleaner (*) so the joint needs to take pressure and heat.

(*) it's actually an ex military portable (pallet sized) nuclear decontamination unit, a Karcher MPDS.
Andrew Mawson, proud to be a member of MetalworkingFun Forum since Oct 2013.
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#16
Jeez, Greg, don't you sleep or eat?
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#17
A buddy gave me a nearly new gas powered pressure washer that didn't get drained and froze the pump head. (if anyone needs a nearly new 6 HP vertical shaft engine?). Anyway i stole the swivel out of it, just has a simple O-ring with back-up washers seal, we'll see how it lasts.
Oh Yah Al, Im a lot better at eating and sleeping than machining.
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Greg
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#18
Decided to go with a contactor for the on off so needed to make an enclosure for the relay and 24 volt transformer. The plasma does an incredible job of cutting sheet metal. With a 40 amp nozzle it cuts slower thus giving sharper corners. Used an old shelf from a office cabinet.

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 Ran conduit over for the 220 supply, wasn't sure on the electrical code, think you need a disconnect switch if its more than a few feet from the service panel so I added a plug in. Finished the plumbing and its good to go. 

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Works like a charm, fairly quiet. Still need some sort of cage or shelf to hold a detergent bottle.

Thanks for watching.
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Greg
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#19
I was gonna ask you about a soap source.
Logan 200, Clarke 7x12, Index 40H Mill, Boyer-Shultz 612 Surface Grinder, HF 4x6 Bandsaw, ...
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#20
Looks very neat. What ever your local code / regulations are, it's a good idea to have a local disconnect to allow easy servicing and testing.
Andrew Mawson, proud to be a member of MetalworkingFun Forum since Oct 2013.
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